Make Your Own Skincare Workshop

Make Your Own Skincare Workshop

A workshop to explore at home health and beauty alternatives along with a discussion around self-care.

Aim

Nico was approached by Tia, a resident wanting to share her knowledge around at home DIY skincare.

The aim of the project was to develop a resident’s confidence in delivering community based workshops.

The project provided a space for residents to learn a new skill and discuss sustainability and environmental impact alongside wellbeing

Location

Longsight

Benefits of learning new skills

Keep learning is one of the Five Ways to Wellbeing, five evidence-based actions which can improve personal wellbeing. Adults engaged in lifelong learning are more likely to be healthier, have better mental health and be more social connected. They are also more likely to participate in the community and decisions concerning the community. Learning new skills increases individuals’ employability, supporting the economic growth of the community. Adults involved in learning are more likely to be involved in their children’s education, helping them learn and raise attainment

Benefits of social activities

Connecting with others is one of the Five Ways to Wellbeing, five evidence-based actions which can improve personal wellbeing. Social connectedness has a strong positive impact on both physical and mental health. Increased social connectedness is linked to reduced mortality risk, healthier lifestyles and higher cognitive functioning. Socially well-connected people are more resilient, feel more able to take charge of their lives and less stressed. Older adults that are socially connected experience increased life satisfaction.

Testimonies

I found that the residents were extremely keen for sessions like this and expressed their interests for future sessions. The funding for this session allowed participants to think outside the box when it comes to items that they would not usually use or think about using for their skin. A huge part of this was a lack of knowledge and it was new to them.”

“I am feeling happy and relaxed. I enjoyed it a lot.”

“Please conduct more, it will help us to relax and enjoy after such a long time in lockdown.”

“The equipment provided, and what we took home with us was a real treat and gave me lots of encouragement.”

Evaluation

The participants were inspired to try and create their own skincare products using everyday kitchen items. not only did they have fun, but this session also gave the participants the opportunity to network, build new friendships and develop new ways of thinking.

During the session the discussion covered general self-care, sharing of hints and tips, and discussing different cultural uses of food products as beauty products. It was a very positive and uplifting space for those in attendance.

The session was over-subscribed, with a waiting list ready to contact once Tia is available to run more. This community session was the first one Tia had tried, and the legacy of this trial session has encouraged Tia to run more and in turn support local residents’ wellbeing.

Project Team

buzz Manchester Health & Wellbeing Service

Tia Calder (Dynamic Engagement Project)

Northmoor Community Association

Residents

Strategic links to local/national policies (Learning New Skills)

Benefit

Policy

Helping people live healthier lives

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

The Manchester Locality Plan – A Healthier Manchester

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Manchester Prevention Programme

Increased mental wellbeing

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Increasing community involvement

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

Manchester Prevention Programme

Socially connected communities

Manchester Population Health Plan

Employability

NHS Five Year Forward View (Department of Health, 2014)

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Our Manchester Strategy

Giving children the best start in life

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Research/evidence base

Duckworth, K. and Cara, O. (2012) The Relationship between Adult Learning and Wellbeing:

Evidence from the 1958 National Child Development Study.

Feinstein, L., Budge, D., Vorhaus, J. and Duckworth, K. (2008). The social and personal benefits

of learning: A summary of key research findings

Foresight, Government Office for Science (2017) - What are the wider benefits of learning across the life course?

New Economics Foundation (2008) – Five ways to wellbeing

NIACE (2011) - Social value of adult learning for community empowerment.

Strategic links to local/national policies (Social Activities)

Benefit

Policy

Social inclusion

Manchester Population Health Plan

NHS Five Year Forward View (Department of Health, 2014)

Enabling resilient communities

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Increased mental wellbeing

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Helping people live healthier lives

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

The Manchester Locality Plan – A Healthier Manchester

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Manchester Prevention Programme

Research/evidence base

Global Council on Brain Health (2017) - The Brain and Social Connectedness

Ministry of Social Development (2018) - The measurement of social connectedness and its relationship to wellbeing

New Economics Foundation (2008) – Five ways to wellbeing

Oliver Huxhold, Martina Miche, Benjamin Schüz. (2014) Benefits of Having Friends in Older Ages: Differential Effects of Informal Social Activities on Well-Being in Middle-Aged and Older Adults, The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Volume 69, Issue 3, Pages 366–375.

Umberson, D. & Montez, J. K. (2010) Social Relationships and Health: A Flashpoint for Health Policy. Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 51(S) S54–S66.

Contact

Nico Dhillon – Neighbourhood Health Worker

Nico.Dhillon@gmmh.nhs.uk


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