Getting Started with New Devices Guides

Getting Started with New Devices Guides

8 digital support guides for older adults, covering various topics to help increase knowledge and skills of the digital world.

Aim

The guides were produced during the coronavirus pandemic to support Manchester’s digital inclusion agenda. They help increase the knowledge, skills and confidence of older people in using their new smartphone, tablet or device.

A significant number of community organisations received funding to purchase new devices through the Manchester Wellbeing Fund’s fast track grants. This was to increase digital connectivity and reduce social isolation amongst the over 50’s.

8 guides were produced: Choosing internet access, finding a website, how to download an app, scams, setting up an email address, video calling, using Microsoft Teams, and a glossary of terms.

Following production of the English versions and some initial evaluation, Women’s Voices and Europia translated all guides into Farsi, Urdu, Arabic, Polish and Romanian.

All guides can be accessed on the buzz website here.

Location

Online & citywide

Benefits of digital Inclusion

Digital inclusion has numerous benefits that have a positive impact on multiple areas of an individual’s life. These benefits include: increased connection; improved mental wellbeing; access to learning; increased employability; economic benefits; health benefits e.g. increased self-care, more informed decision making; increased independent living for people with disabilities.

Benefits of Learning New Skills

Keep learning is one of the Five Ways to Wellbeing, five evidence-based actions which can improve personal wellbeing. Adults engaged in lifelong learning are more likely to be healthier, have better mental health and be more social connected. They are also more likely to participate in the community and decisions concerning the community. Learning new skills increases individuals’ employability, supporting the economic growth of the community. Adults involved in learning are more likely to be involved in their children’s education, helping them learn and raise attainment.

Benefits of Health Promotions - opportunistic interventions

Health promotion supports personal and social development and enables people to take more control over their own health. Providing information and screening are some examples of health promotion. Giving people access to relevant and accurate health information puts them in a better position to make healthier choices for prevention and self-management of conditions. Qualitative data shows that opportunistic and community-based screening opportunities can reach people who would not have accessed screening otherwise.

Testimonies

"The guides that buzz Manchester have created have been essential to our operations and the roll out of the device schemes. These guides have been sent out to 150+ Digital Champion Volunteers and over 1,000 residents, and have played a key role in assisting residents in becoming digitally literate. All the guides are created in a format that is easy for digitally excluded residents to follow, and it is amazing that they now offer the guides in other languages." - Jack Fitzgerald, Digital Inclusion Coordinator, Manchester City Council


Evaluation

The project was very well received by partner organisations, residents and Manchester’s Digital Inclusion Working Group.

64 organisations who received devices through the Manchester Wellbeing Fund received digital copies of all guides. 1,050 residents received printed versions of the guides through Manchester City Council’s Free Device Scheme.

A poster was developed to promote the guides, this was placed across Manchester in various community venues and health centres.

Project Team

buzz Manchester Health & Wellbeing Service – Simon Kitchin & Lorna Dawson

Women’s Voices

Europia

Manchester City Council – Jack Fitzgerald & the Digital Inclusion Working Group

Strategic links to local/national policies (digital inclusion)

Benefit

Policy

Increased mental wellbeing

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Improving employment prospects

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Reduced health inequalities (as a result of improved employability, finances etc)

Fair Society, Healthy Lives (Institute of Health Equity, 2010)

NHS Five Year Forward View (Department of Health, 2014).

Supporting self-care and enabling individuals and communities to manage their own health and wellbeing

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

General Practice Forward View (NHS England, 2016)

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Manchester’s Self-Care Strategy

Manchester Prevention Programme

Addressing the digital divide

UK Digital Strategy 2017

Research/evidence base

Age UK (2018) - Digital Inclusion Evidence Review 2018

Centre for Economics and Business Research (2015) - The economic impact of Basic Digital Skills and inclusion in the UK

DevicesDotNow (2020) - Interim Impact Report #2: 24 March - 26 June

Iriss (2020) - Digital inclusion, exclusion and participation

Tinder Foundation and the Good Things Foundation (2016) - HEALTH & DIGITAL: REDUCING INEQUALITIES, IMPROVING SOCIETY - An evaluation of the Widening Digital Participation programme.

Strategic links to local/national policies (Learning new skills)

Benefit

Policy

Helping people live healthier lives

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

The Manchester Locality Plan – A Healthier Manchester

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Manchester Prevention Programme

Increased mental wellbeing

Manchester Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Increasing community involvement

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (MH Government, 2010)

Manchester Prevention Programme

Socially connected communities

Manchester Population Health Plan

Employability

NHS Five Year Forward View (Department of Health, 2014)

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Our Manchester Strategy

Giving children the best start in life

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

Research/evidence base

Duckworth, K. and Cara, O. (2012) The Relationship between Adult Learning and Wellbeing:

Evidence from the 1958 National Child Development Study.

Feinstein, L., Budge, D., Vorhaus, J. and Duckworth, K. (2008). The social and personal benefits

of learning: A summary of key research findings

Foresight, Government Office for Science (2017) - What are the wider benefits of learning across the life course?

New Economics Foundation (2008) – Five ways to wellbeing

NIACE (2011) - Social value of adult learning for community empowerment.

Strategic links to local/national policies (Health promotion)

Benefit

Policy

Empowers people

Healthy Lives, Healthy People (HM Government, 2010)

NHS Five Year Forward View (Department of Health, 2014)

Supports prevention

Greater Manchester Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy

The Manchester Prevention Programme

Supports self-care and self-management of conditions

Make Every Contact Count (Future Forum, Department of Health, 2011)

Taking Charge of our Health and Social Care in Greater Manchester (GMCA, 2015)

Manchester’s Self-Care Strategy

Increases participation for groups who would not usually access

Fair Society, Healthy Lives (Institute of Health Equity, 2010)


Research/evidence base

King’s Fund (2008) Using Information to Promote Healthy Behaviours

Health Foundation (2011) Evidence: Helping People Help Themselves

Institute for Public Policy Research (2020) Prevention in the Age of Information: Public Education for Better Health

Perry et al (2016) The NHS health check programme in England: a qualitative study Health Promotion International, 31 (1), 106-115

WHO (1986) The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion


Contact

Simon Kitchin – Age Friendly Neighbourhood Health Worker

0161 123 4567

07552 249 977

Simon.Kitchin@gmmh.nhs.uk




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Local resident attending Spoon and Ladle afternoon tea, Burnage

Local resident attending Spoon and Ladle afternoon tea, Burnage photo